Learn to Code: What’s the Best Programming Language to Learn First?

coding

19 Jan Learn to Code: What’s the Best Programming Language to Learn First?

Whether you’re looking to build an app for a hobby, improve your career prospects or have a great startup idea learning to code is going to be an important skill to develop.

The problem is if you are a complete novice it can be difficult to know exactly where to start. Perhaps you’ve asked your developer friends for some ideas or even read a few blog posts to try and get your head around some of the best places to learn to code.

For example if you are looking to start a new career in 2016 then it might useful to see how likely are you going to get a job based on the programming language you know? Hereโ€™s a quick look at job trends from indeed.com:

 

So to help you get to grips with learning to code and to help you make your mind up I’ve put together an infographic with helpful information for complete coding novices.

 

What code should I learn cheat sheet

 

Please feel free to share!

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Jamie

My name is Jamie Spencer and I have spent the past 5 years building money making blogs. After growing tired of the 9-5, commuting and never seeing my family I decided that I wanted to make some changes and launched my first blog. Since then I have launched lots of successful niche blogs and after selling my survivalist blog I decided to teach other people how to do the same.

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23 Comments
  • Michael
    Posted at 14:13h, 20 January Reply

    This is the coolest infographic I have seen on the subject matter. It has helped answer my burning question on what programming language to learn. Thanks

  • David Sivocha
    Posted at 15:45h, 21 January Reply

    Your PHP section reuses the pros and cons of Ruby. Just a heads up

    • Jamie
      Posted at 17:07h, 21 January Reply

      Sorted. Thanks David

  • Joe
    Posted at 17:03h, 21 January Reply

    I like the infographic ๐Ÿ˜‰ Just one thing: In Java sheet You have Python job market.

    • Jamie
      Posted at 17:06h, 21 January Reply

      Amended. Thanks for the spot!

  • Kevin Flanagan
    Posted at 17:06h, 21 January Reply

    Where’s Clojure & ClojureScript?

  • Adam
    Posted at 01:31h, 22 January Reply

    Where’s Golang?

    • Jamie
      Posted at 12:57h, 22 January Reply

      We can’t add them all I’m afraid. We chose the most popular 9 languages to start with. We may do more in the next few months.

  • Donna
    Posted at 03:28h, 24 January Reply

    Thanks for the great infographic! I’m changing my vocation, and it’s great to know which language(s) I should learn next!

    • Jamie
      Posted at 14:32h, 26 January Reply

      Glad it’s helped you out Donna! All the best!

  • Son Vo
    Posted at 05:21h, 25 January Reply

    Hi! I’m Son from Vietnam. I’ve seen your Inforgraphics and it’s so great! Can I translate it into Vietnamese? Thanks a lot ๐Ÿ™‚

  • Ikhbar Bismoko
    Posted at 16:27h, 06 February Reply

    Hi! I’m Ikhbar from Indonesia. I look it was so helped. I want to make a translation. May I?

    • Jamie
      Posted at 11:30h, 08 February Reply

      Yes! Please do! Let me know when it’s live. Would love to see it!

  • Alexis Brenon
    Posted at 14:32h, 12 February Reply

    Your ‘Mechanical language’ description is the same as the ‘Concurrent’ one.
    Very good infographics, it is a very good sum up of major languages.

  • George Murphy
    Posted at 23:05h, 05 March Reply

    A very helpful resource for someone who knows virtually nothing. Is it possible to get the graphic in individual segments? (I want to copy it into a Word doc for my son.)

    One bit of fine tuning on the periodic chart: the correct version is COBOL (two “O”‘s), not COBAL. COBOL is an acronym for Common Business Oriented Language and was popular in the 1960s and 1970s. It drew a lot of attention in the late 1990s in advance of the year 2000 when everyone was afraid that computers would go haywire in the changeover from 1999 to 2000 – the so-called “Y2K” problem. The Y2K problem arose because in the 1960 and 1970;s, memory was very expensive. To minimize its usage, the field for years in COBOL was a two-digit field. That raised the concern that, when 1999 became 2000, computers might not be able to distinguish between 1900 versus 2000.

    • Jamie
      Posted at 20:31h, 06 March Reply

      Thanks George. I’ll chop it up and add it later this week for you.

  • Nicole Vagt
    Posted at 13:20h, 19 March Reply

    Great resource to find some light in the jungle of programming languages! I will definitely share this to help other people find their favorite language. Thanks for this helpful infographic that deserves its name.

  • John Kozicke
    Posted at 18:56h, 05 April Reply

    I teach Computer Science at my school and would love to get a printout of these and make them into a poster. Any chance of being able to do that?

    • Jamie
      Posted at 19:01h, 05 April Reply

      Yeah no problem John. That would be great!
      I can make them into separate parts if that helps?

  • Aakash
    Posted at 08:10h, 19 April Reply

    Thank you ! For sharing this valuable information all together.

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